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: Student Life : Black History Month

Black History Month

The Office of Student Life seeks to provide events that edify, entertain, enlighten, inspire, and engender a genuine understanding and appreciation of diversity on campus and in our community, as well as gives students opportunities to enrich their education and develop leadership skills. Through poetry, prose, song, dance, film and lectures, Black History Month events teach of the contributions of African Americans to the political, cultural and social fabric of Central Georgia and the nation.

For more information about Black History Month events, contact the Office of Student Life at (478) 471-2710. Black History Month events are supported with student activity fees.

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2016 Events

Black History Month Poster
Black History Month 2016 Poster

2015 Events

Black History Month Poster
Black History Month 2015 Poster

2014 Events

2014 Black History Month Poster
Black History Month 2014 Poster

2013 Events

2013 Black History Month Poster
Black History Month 2013 Poster

Black History Month 2012

The Atlanta Chapter of the Buffalo Soldiers and the performance poet Roger Bonair-Agard will appear at Middle Georgia State for the college's Black History Month observances. The Middle Georgia State University Black Student Unification & Student African American Brotherhood will sponsor the Third Annual Heritage Preservation and Unification Luncheon. Here is the schedule of events, which are free and open to the public:

A History of the Buffalo Soldiers
Presentation by members of the Atlanta Chapter of the Buffalo Soldiers

Thursday, Feb. 16
12:30p.m. in the Arts Complex Theater, Macon Campus

"Buffalo Soldier" was the nickname given by the Indians to members of African American cavalry regiments of the U.S. Army who served in the western United States from 1867 to 1896. Many of the soldiers had fought in the Union Army during the Civil War. An 1866 law authorized the U.S. Army to form cavalry and infantry regiments of black men. The resulting units were the 9th and 10th cavalries, who became known as the Buffalo Soldiers, noted for their courage and discipline. (Source: Encyclopedia Britannica online.)

Poet Roger Bonair-Agard
Reading and Lecture
Wednesday, Feb. 22
11:00a.m. in the Arts Complex Theater, Macon Campus
5:45p.m. in Walker Auditorium in the Academic Services Building, Warner Robins Campus

A professional performance poet since 1997, Bonair-Agard is a two-time National Poetry Slam champion. A native of Trinidad and Tobago, he has lived in New York for nearly two decades and currently is writer-in-residence with Vision Into Art,a music and interdisciplinary arts production company in New York City. He has appeared three times on Russell Simmons' Def Poetry Jam on HBO, and he is coauthor of Burning Down the House (2000) and author of Tarnish and Masquerade (2006) and Gully (2010).

Bonair-Agard also is cofounder and artistic director of the louder ARTS Project, an organization dedicated to the evolution of poetry through the craft of writing and performance.
Black History Month 2012

 

Black Student Unification & Student African American Brotherhood sponsor the
Third Annual Heritage Preservation and Unification Luncheon

Theme: Empowering Youth of Today to Meet the Challenges of Tomorrow
Panel Discussion by students of Middle Georgia State University
Moderator: Mr. Kevin Johnson, Student Support Services
LOCATION: REHEARSAL HALL (HUMANITIES BLDG)
DATE: Friday, 2 March 2012
TIME: 11:00 A.M.
COST: $5.00
BHM: Poster of Diahann Carroll, Dorothy Dandridge, Zora Neale Hurston, and Rosa Parks

Black History Month 2011

Black History Month 2011 events included:

  • Marquetta L. Goodwine, officially known as Queen Quet, chieftess of the Gullah/Geechee Nation, presented a program on the Gullah/Geechee people at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Monday, Feb. 7, in the Arts Complex Theater at Middle Georgia State University. The Gullah are African Americans who live in the Lowcountry region of South Carolina and Georgia, which includes both the coastal plain and the Sea Islands. The Gullah people and their language are also called Geechee. The Gullah are known for preserving more of their African linguistic and cultural heritage than any other African-American community in the United States. Queen Quet is a published author, computer scientist, mathematician, historian, and preservationist. She founded the Gullah/Geechee Sea Island Coalition, the premiere advocacy organization for the continuation of Gullah/Geechee culture. Her writings include a 30-volume series on Gullah/Geechee culture and a Gullah anthology.
  • A lecture/performance on the history of jazz by Jimmy Mills and the GQ Jazz Quintet, 7 p.m., Wednesday, Feb. 16, in the Arts Complex Rehearsal Hall.
    BHM poster

Black History Month 2010

The theme for Black History Month 2010 at Middle Georgia State was Finding, Loving and Respecting Self.

Shana Burton read from her works and talked about the writing process, at 11 a.m. on Monday, Feb. 8, 2010, in the Arts Complex Theatre on the Macon campus. She spoke again at 6 p.m. in Thomas Hall, Room 116, on the Warner Robins Campus.

The Affrilachian Poets read poetry as part of Black History Month. Poets Ricardo Nazario-Colon, Bianca Spriggs-Floyd and Keith Wilson read on Feb. 16, in the Arts Complex Theatre at the 11 a.m.

The Black History Month committee also sponsored a student poetry contest which was judged by the Affrilachian Poets, who announced the winners Feb. 16.

In celebration of Black History Month, Black Student Unification hosted a Heritage Preservation Luncheon featuring author and spoken word artist Jerome Enders on Friday, Feb. 26, 2010, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Arts Complex Rehearsal Hall. Everyone was invited. Cost was $5.

Black History Month 2010 poster
Jerome Enders event by Black Student Unification

Black History Month 2009

EVENTS OPEN TO PUBLIC, FREE

Middle Georgia State University celebrated BLACK HISTORY MONTH 2009

Black History Month 2009 at Middle Georgia State University included a Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day commemoration, a musical performance and a poetry reading.

The Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day Commemoration was Jan. 15, 2009, at 12:30 p.m. in the Arts Complex Theatre. It included songs, dance, inspirational speeches and a photo slide show of King's life and the Civil Rights Movement. The event was sponsored by Black Student Unification and Voices of Diversity.

Bass-baritone Ronald Campbell accompanied by Susan McDuffie, performed Feb. 24, at 7 p.m. in the Arts Complex Rehearsal Hall on the Macon Campus, and Wednesday, Feb. 25 , at 11 a.m. in the Walker Auditorium (in Academic Services Building) on the Warner Robins Campus.

Atlanta native Tayari Jones, spoke March 4 at 11 a.m., in the Arts Complex Theatre on the Macon Campus, and at 7 p.m. in the Walker Auditorium (in Academic Services Building) on the Warner Robins Campus.

Campbell is a classically trained vocalist specializing in African-American spirituals, anthems, arias, art songs, choral music, German Lieder, operas, and show tunes. He studied at Howard University in Washington, D.C., and Concordia College in Bronxville, New York.
Campbell has performed at numerous churches and art venues throughout the U.S., including The Kennedy Center of Performing Arts, Berean Baptist Church, Ira Alridge Theater, St. Mary's Episcopal Church, and Unity of Washington, D.C.

Jones, a Magna cum laude graduate of Spelman College, currently is an assistant professor in the MFA program at Rutgers University in Newark, New Jersey. She is an award-winning novelist, labeled by Essence magazine as "a writer to watch." Her first novel, Leaving Atlanta (2002), is a coming-of-age story set during the city's infamous child murders of 1979-81. Atlanta Magazine named it Novel of the Year.
Her second novel, The Untelling (2005), is the story of a family struggling to overcome the aftermath of a fatal car accident.
Black History Month 2009

Black History Month 2008

EVENTS OPEN TO PUBLIC, FREE

Middle Georgia State University celebrates Diversity Through Artistic Expression

Black History Month 2008 featured poetry readings from Frank X Walker on Feb. 11, and an art exhibit by Annie L. Greene, March 14-26. Black History Month events are supported by the College's Black History Month Committee, the Artists & Lecturers Committee, Black Student Unification, Voices for Diversity and Office of Student Life. All events were free and open to the public. For more information contact Mary Mears at .

Walker held poetry readings at 11 a.m. in the Arts Complex Theatre on the Macon campus and at 6 p.m. in the Walker Auditorium in the Academic Services building on the Warner Robins campus.

Kentucky native Frank X Walker is a founding member of the Affrilachian Poets, the editor of "Eclipsing a Nappy New Millennium" and the author of three poetry collections: "Black Box" (2005), "Buffalo Dance: the Journey of York" (2003) and "Affrilachia" (2000).

Walker's poems have been converted into a stage production by the University of Kentucky's theatre department and published in numerous anthologies He appeared on PBS;s GED Connection Series ("Writing: Getting Ideas on Paper"), and he co-produced a documentary titled "Coal Black Voices: the History of the Affrilachian Poets."

Walker created the word "Afirilachia," explaining, "I believe it is my responsibility to say as loudly and as often as possible that people and artists of color are part of the past and present of the multi-state Appalachian region extending from northern Mississippi to southern New York."

Green's work was on display at the Middle Georgia State University Library March 14-26. She is a painter and craftsman, is best known for her yarn paintings, many of which have been on display at colleges, museums, libraries and cultural centers throughout Georgia.

Greene originally painted in arts and acrylics, but it was her yarn art that earned her regional recognition. Much other yarn paintings celebrate her memories of summers spent on her grandparents' farm in Adel, Ga.

A retired educator, Greene taught art in elementary and high schools as well as colleges. She resides in LaGrange, Ga.

Black History Month 2007

News Release - February 2007

EVENTS OPEN TO PUBLIC, FREE

Middle Georgia State University Celebrates Black History Month

Middle Georgia State University's Black History Month celebration spotlights the African American voice in film, on stage and in worship. "Our theme this year is 'African American Film, Drama and Religion: From Hollywood to Heaven,'" said Mary Mears, who chairs Middle Georgia State's Black History Month Committee. "All of our events are free, and we invite the public to all of them."

Black History Month Events at Middle Georgia State University

  • God's Trombones, Thursday, Feb. 8, 6:30 p.m. in the Middle Georgia State University Theatre, located in the Arts Complex. Under the direction of Dr. Freda Scott Giles, the First A.M.E. Church Drama Troupe of Athens, Ga., presents an oral interpretation of James Weldon Johnson's book of poetry, God's Trombones: Seven Negro Sermons in Verse, published in 1927. Johnson, a major author from the Harlem Renaissance period, sought to capture the essences of the African American worship experience through his poetic evocation of the preacher's sermon. He selected favorite subjects such as the opening prayer, the creation of the world, the story of the Prodigal Son, the funeral sermon, the story of Noah, the Crucifixion, the story of Moses and The Last Judgment, and he recast them as poems. The First A.M.E. Church Drama Troupe broadens the spectrum of the poetry to include multiple voice and choral readings, as well as traditional hymns and spirituals to set off the poetry. Dr. Giles is an associate professor of theatre in the University of Georgia's Institute for African American Studies.
  • Love Trap, a feature film by Frank B. Goodin II, Wednesday, Feb. 21, at 8:15 p.m., at Middle Georgia State's Warner Robins Campus (Auditorium in the Academic Services Building) AND Thursday, Feb. 22, at 11:00 a.m. in the MGA Theatre. Goodin, a Florida State University film school graduate, wrote, produced and directed the independent film Love Trap, which tells the story of a pre-law student who nearly wrecks his engagement when he falls for Angel, "a pool-hall hottie," who makes the moves on him one night. Goodin describes his first feature film as "a positive, entertaining black film that's free of negative stereotypes and full of truth and inspiration." Love Trap, which Goodin shot in Jacksonville, Fla., for less than $100,000, was named Best Feature Film at Black Film Festivals in Atlanta, San Francisco and Houston, and it won the Audience Choice Award at the Houston festival in 2005.
  • A lecture by religious historian Dr. Judith Weisenfeld, Monday, Feb. 26, at 7:00 p.m. in the MGA Theatre AND Tuesday, Feb. 27, at 11:00 a.m. in the MGA Theatre. Dr. Weisenfeld, the William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of Religion at Vassar College, will lecture on her most recent work, Hollywood Be Thy Name: African American Religion in American Film, 1929-1949, the first book to examine how the movies constructed images of African American religion. She explores how these cinematic representations reflected - and contributed to -- complicated discourses about race, the social and moral requirements of American citizenship, and the very nature of American identity. A specialist in 20th century African American religious history, Dr. Weisenfeld has published widely on African American women and religion, religion and American film, and urban religion, and she is the founder of the online journal The North Star: A Journal of African American Religious History.

Black History Month 2006

News Release - February 2006

EVENTS OPEN TO PUBLIC, FREE

Middle Georgia State University Celebrates Black History Month

Middle Georgia State University's Black History Month celebration spotlights the African American voice in music and literature, covering everything from jazz to classical and gospel to hip hop.

"Our theme this year is 'Expressions: The African American Voice in Music and Literature,'" said Mary Mears, who chairs Middle Georgia State's Black History Month Committee. "All of our events are free, and we invite the public to all of them."

Black History Month Events at Middle Georgia State University

  • Lecture and reading by Atlanta author Shauna Austin Grice, 11:00 a.m. Monday, Feb. 6, in the Middle Georgia State University Theatre, located in the Arts Complex. Her debut novel is The Memoirs of Sara Harvey, the story of a brave girl and a murder in a racially divided Southern community. The narrator is feisty 84-year-old Sara Harvey, who takes readers back to the 1930s rural South. Atlanta Woman Magazine calls the novel "graceful, classic storytelling at its best."
  • A performance by the GQ Jazz Band under the direction of Jimmy Mills, 5:00 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 8, in the Student Life Center. A coffee house will be set up courtesy of the Office of Student Life.
  • A lecture by Dr. Ralph Watkins, Thursday, Feb. 16, 11:00 a.m. in the MGA Theatre and 7:00 p.m. at the College's Warner Robins Campus. His topic is "The Past, Present and Future of Hip Hop: The Blueprint." Watkins is assistant dean of African-American Church Studies and associate professor of Society, Religion and Africana Studies in the School of Theology at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, Calif. His work focuses on building bridges between urban youth and the church and mentoring future leaders of the African-American church. He is the author of I Ain't Afraid to Speak My Mind, and his chapter on "Rap, Religion and New Realities: The Emergence of a Religious Discourse in Rap Music" appears in the book Noise and Spirit: The Religious Sensibilities of Rap Music.
  • A performance by Georgia Southwestern State University's Gospel Choir, 7:00 p.m. Monday, Feb. 20, in the MGA Rehearsal Hall in the Arts Complex.
  • A performance by the Middle Georgia State University Chamber Singers featuring Amanda Green, under the direction of Rebecca Lanning, 12:00 noon Monday, Feb. 27, in the MGA Rehearsal Hall in the Arts Complex.

Black History Month 2005

News Release - February 2005

EVENTS OPEN TO PUBLIC, FREE

Middle Georgia State University Celebrates Black History Month

Middle Georgia State University students - and the public - will get a chance to meet World War II veterans who were part of the famous Tuskegee Airmen" and baseball great "Red" Moore who played with the Negro Baseball Leagues in the 1930s.

They are among the guests visiting the college during Black History Month in February.

"Our theme this year is The Legacy of Our Ancestors,'" said Mary Mears, who chairs Middle Georgia State's Black History Month Committee. "All of our events are free and open to the public."

Tuskegee Airmen, Atlanta Chapter

11:00 a.m. Monday, Feb. 7, Wamer Robins Campus (Academic Services Building) 7:00 p.m., Monday, Feb. 7, Macon campus (MGA Theatre in Arts Complex)

Ten members of the Atlanta Chapter, Tuskegee Airmen will visit Middle Georgia State's main campus and Warner Robins Campus on Feb. 7. Come meet Atlanta Chapter president Val Archer and members Don Chapman, Hirman Little, A. Reginald Eaves, John E. Stewart, Don Summerlin, Jesse Creech, Bill Patterson, Samuel A. Jones and Joel Baker and hear their stories.

The Atlanta Chapter, Tuskegee Airmen Inc., incorporated in 1972, is an education and community service organization dedicated to maintaining the traditions of the Tuskegee Airmen and preserving the legacy of the first generation of African American military aviators of World War II.

The African American airmen who became single-engine or multi-engine pilots were trained at Tuskegee Army Air Field in Tuskegee, Alabama. The first aviation cadet class began in July 1941 and completed training nine months later. From 1942 through 1946, approximately 1,000 pilots graduated at TAAF, receiving commissions and pilot wings. More than 450 African American fighter pilots, under the command of Col. Benjamin 0. Davis Jr., fought in the aerial war over North Africa, Sicily and Europe, flying 1,553 sorties and completing 1,578 missions with the 12th Tactical U.S. Army Air Force and the 15th Strategic Army Air Forces.

Negro Baseball Leagues 11:00 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 15, Middle Georgia State University Theatre

James "Red" Moore, who played in the Negro Baseball Leagues, will join baseball historian and author James A. Riley for a presentation at 11:00 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 15, in the Middle Georgia State University Theatre in the Arts Complex

In the 1930s, "Red" Moore played in the Negro National League, Negro American League and Negro Southern League. One sports reporter said of the first baseman, "In Red Moore, the (Negro) American League has probably the greatest retriever of scatter-gun throws in America. Moore's knack for picking erratic throws out of the dust, his marvelous throwing arm and errorless play on a sort of chance place him first."

In 1934, Moore played semipro ball with the Macon Peaches, then started his professional career one year later when he signed on with the Negro Southern League's Chattanooga Choos Choos and the Atlanta Black Crackers. During his career, he also played with the Mohawk Giants of Schenectady, N.Y., the Newark Eagles, the Indianapolis ABCs and the Baltimore Elite Giants. He was picked for the Southern News Services All-American Negro League Baseball Team in 1938.

In 1941, he entered military service for the duration of World War II, serving in England, Belgium and France in a combat engineer battalion attached to General George Patton's Third Army.

James A Riley's "The Biographical Encyclopedia of the Negro Baseball Leagues," published in 1994. includes 4,162 entries with more than 4,000 biographical listings on players, team histories and league histories. It is considered the most comprehensive work chronicling this era of baseball history.

He also is recognized as a foremost authority on the Negro Baseball Leagues, having written six books on the subject, and, since 1996, he has served as research director for the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum in Kansas City, Missouri. In addition to his countless contributions to books, compilations, magazines and journals, Riley has appeared on the PBS-produced "Safe at Home Plate" and ESPN's "A League Second to None."

A former president of the Society for American Baseball Research, Riley created a Web site (www.blackbaseball.com) dedicated to telling the story of the Negro Baseball Leagues.

Georgia Commissioner of Labor Michael Thurmond 7:00 p.m. Monday, Feb. 21, in Middle Georgia State University Theatre

Michael Thurmond became the first African American elected to a statewide office in Georgia when he won the 1998 race for commissioner of the Department of Labor. An attorney and author, he made history in 1986 when he became the first African American elected to the Georgia General Assembly from Clarke County since Reconstruction.

In 1994, then Gov. Zel Miller selected him to direct Georgia's transition from welfare-to-work as head of DFACS. In this role, Thurmond created the innovative workfirst program that helped 90,000 welfare-dependent families move into the workforce.

In 1997, he was named a distinguished lecturer at the University of Georgia's Carl Vinson Institute of Government. Thurmond, an attorney, has degrees from Paine College and the University of South Carolina School of Law. He is the author of "Freedom: Georgia's Anti-Slavery Heritage, 1733 to 1865" and "Story Untold: Black Men and Women in Athens History."

Community Activist, Author and Educator Dr. Catherine Meeks 10:00 a.m. Wednesday, Feb. 23, in the Middle Georgia State University Theatre

Dr. Catherine Meeks is the Clara Carter Acree Distinguished Professor of Social Science at Wesleyan College. She is the first African American professor to hold tenure at the historic women's college in Macon.

A professor of African American studies at Mercer University for nearly two decades, Dr. Meeks also headed up the Youth Violence Prevention Task Force for the City of Macon, and she is the co-founder and executive director of Aunt Maggie's Kitchen Table, a resource center for women who are homeless and in need.

She is the author of "I Want Somebody to Know My Name" and "Macon's Black Heritage: The Untold Story." She has degrees from Pepperdine University, Atlanta University and Emory University.

Middle Georgia State University Celebrates Black History Month

Middle Georgia State University students will learn about The Legacy of Our Ancestors when they celebrate Black History Month in February. All events are open to the public, and admission is free. Events include:

  • A presentation by the Atlanta Chapter, Tuskegee Airmen at 11:00 a.m. at Middle Georgia State's Warner Robins Campus and at 7:00 p.m. in the Middle Georgia State University Theatre on Monday, Feb. 7.
  • A presentation by Negro Baseball Leagues veteran "Red" Moore and baseball historian/author James A. Riley at 11:00 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 15, in the Middle Georgia State University Theatre.
  • A lecture by Georgia Department of Labor Commissioner Michael Thurmond at 7:00 p.m. Monday, Feb. 21, in the Middle Georgia State University Theatre.
  • A lecture by community activist, educator and author Dr. Catherine Meeks at 10 a.m. Wednesday in the Middle Georgia State University Theatre.

Black History Month 2004

News Release - February 2004

EVENTS OPEN TO PUBLIC, FREE

Black History Month Celebration at Middle Georgia State University Focuses on Music, Motion and Meter

Middle Georgia State University students will explore The African-American Experience: Music, Motion and Meter when they celebrate Black History Month in February. All events are open to the public, and admission is free.

Dr. Jon Michael Spencer, What Is Black Music? at 7:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 23, in the Middle Georgia State University Auditorium and The Blues Nature of African American Culture at Middle Georgia State's Warner Robins Campus (Academic Services Building) at 9:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 24.

Dr. Spencer, professor of religious studies at the University of South Carolina, teaches a broad range of courses in music, religion and American studies, including Rastafarians and Reggae, Creativity, and Religious Expression in African American Music. He also has taught music at the University of Richmond, African American studies at the University of North Carolina, popular culture at Bowling Green State University, and Black Church studies and sacred music at Duke University Divinity School.

Dr. Spencer will talk about What Is Black Music? at 7:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 23, in the Middle Georgia State University Auditorium, off Ivey Drive. He will be at Middle Georgia State's Warner Robins Campus (Academic Services Building) at 9:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 24, for his lecture on The Blues Nature of African American Culture.

Terrie Ajile Axam and Oginga Love, Fusion - from Africa to Hip Hop to the Middle Georgia State University Theatre at 11:00 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 26.

Axam and Love, co-artistic directors of the Atlanta-based Total Dance/Dancical Productions Inc., bring their production of Fusion - from Africa to Hip Hop to the Middle Georgia State University Theatre at 11:00 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 26.

Fusion combines dance, drumming, music and vocals with modern multimedia to demonstrate the impact African culture has had on American culture. Axam, founder of Dancical Productions and co-creator of Fusion, will discuss the historical perspective of music and dance in Africa and trace its influences in various cultures with an emphasis on North America. She is a dancer, choreographer, vocalist and arts educator who has toured internationally as a backup vocalist and choreographer with the hip hop/R&B group Arrested Development. Love is a master drummer, percussionist, dancer, actor and artist. He attended the Katherine Dunham Performing Arts Center in East St. Louis, studying with Senegalese Master Drummer MorThiam.

Sonya Sanchez, Poet, Playwright and Scholar, 6:00 p.m. Tuesday, March 2, at MGA Theatre

Poet, playwright, scholar and activist Sonia Sanchez, who is considered to be one of the most influential female' authors of the Black Arts Movement, will lecture and read from her works at 6:00 p.m. Tuesday, March 2 in the Middle Georgia State University Theatre.

Sanchez is the author of 14 books, including Does Your House Have Lions?, which was nominated for the NAACP Image Award and National Book Critics Circle Award, Homegins & Handgrenades, the recipient of an American Book Award, and, most recently, Shake Loose My Skin: New and Collected Poems. She also is a contributing editor to Black Scholar and The Journal of African Studies.

She is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts, the Outstanding Arts Award from the Pennsylvania Coalition of 100 Black Women and the Community Service Award from the National Black Caucus of State Legislators. She also was named the Ford Freedom Scholar by the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History and Ford Motor Company.

Sanchez began her teaching career in 1965 at the Downtown Community School in New York. She was the first Presidential Fellow at Temple University, where she began teaching in 1977. She held the Laura Carnell Chair in English and Women's Studies there until her retirement in 1999. A native of Birmingham, she now lives in Philadelphia.

Black History Month Celebration at Middle Georgia State University Focuses on Music, Motion and Meter

Middle Georgia State University students will explore The African-American Experience: Music, Motion and Meter when they celebrate Black History Month in February. All events are open to the public, and admission is free.

Dr. Jon Michael Spencer, professor of religious studies at the University of South Carolina, will talk about What Is Black Music? at 7:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 23, in the Middle Georgia State University Auditorium, off Ivey Drive. He will be at Middle Georgia State's Warner Robins Campus (Academic Services Building) at 9:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 24, for his lecture on The Blues Nature of African American Culture.

Terrie Ajile Axam and Oginga Love, co-artistic directors of the Atlanta-based Total Dance/Dancical Productions Inc., bring their production of Fusion - from Africa to Hip Hop to the Middle Georgia State University Theatre at 11:00 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 26. Fusion combines dance, drumming, music and vocals with modern multimedia to demonstrate the impact African culture has had on American culture.

Poet, playwright, scholar and activist Sonia Sanchez, who is considered to be one of the most influential female authors of the Black Arts Movement, will lecture and read from her works at 6:00 p.m. Tuesday, March 2, in the Middle Georgia State University Theatre. She is the author of 14 books, including Does Your House Have Lions?, which was nominated for the NAACP Image Award and National Book Critics Circle Award, and Homegirls & Handgrenades, the recipient of an American Book Award.

Black History Month 2003

News Release - January 2003

EVENTS OPEN TO PUBLIC, FREE

Award-winning Broadcast Journalist and Novelist Visit Middle Georgia State University During Black History Month

ABC News correspondent Deborah Roberts and award-winning novelist Dr. Elizabeth Nunez will lecture at Middle Georgia State University in February as part of the college's Black History Month celebration. The theme for 2003 is "Great Communicators."

DEBORAH ROBERTS

Roberts, who grew up in Perry, Ga., and graduated from Perry High School in 1978, will give two lectures on Monday, Feb. 24. At 11:00 a.m., she will talk to Middle Georgia State students. Her lecture at 7:00 p.m. in the MGA Theatre is open to the public. Due to limited space, seating will be available on a first-come, first-serve basis. Admission is free.

She is a correspondent for ABC News and the network's newsmagazine 20/20. She has hosted a live daily news program, Lifetime Live, on Lifetime Television, and she has anchored ABC's World News Weekend and co-hosted Good Morning America. Before joining the ABC news team eight years ago, she was a correspondent for NBC Nightly News and Dateline NBC.

DR. ELIZABETH NUNEZ

Nunez is a Distinguished Professor of English at Medgar Evers College of the City University of New York and the author of essays, short stories and five novels: Grace, Discretion, Bruised Hibiscus, Beyond the Limbo Silence and When Rocks Dance.

She will lecture at 11:00 a.m. Thursday, February 13, in the MGA Auditorium. This event is open to the public.

Nunez received the 2001 American Book Award for Bruised Hibiscus and the 1999 Independent Publishers Award for Beyond the Limbo Silence. From 1986 to 2000, she was the director of the National Black Writers Conference, which she co-founded with author John Oliver Killens of Macon.

Black History Month events

ABC News correspondent Deborah Roberts and award-winning novelist Dr. Elizabeth Nunez will lecture at Middle Georgia State University in February as part of the college's Black History Month celebration. The theme for 2003 is "Great Communicators."

Deborah Roberts, who grew up in Perry, Ga., and graduated from Perry High School in 1978, will give two lectures on Monday, Feb. 24. At 11:00 a.m., she will talk to Middle Georgia State students. Her lecture at 7:00 p.m. in the MGA Theatre is open to the public. Due to limited space, seating is available on a first-come, first-serve basis. Admission is free. The Emmy Award-winning journalist is a correspondent for ABC News and the network's newsmagazine 20/20.

Nunez is a Distinguished Professor of English at Medgar Evers College of the City University of New York and the author of essays, short stories and five novels. She will lecture at 11:00 a.m. Thursday, February 13, in the MGA Auditorium. This event is open to the public. Admission is free. She received the 2001 American Book Award for Bruised Hibiscus and the 1999 Independent Publishers Award for Beyond the Limbo Silence.

Black History Month 2002

News Release - January 2002

EVENTS OPEN TO PUBLIC, FREE

String Quartet, Soloist, Artist and Writer Visit Middle Georgia State University During Black History Month

Middle Georgia State University students will celebrate Black History Month with musical performances, an art exhibit and a lecture on Civil Rights leader Fred Shuttlesworth. The events, all open to the public, are scheduled during February. Admission to each is free.

Middle Georgia State's Black History Month observance begins Friday, Feb. 1, with the Marian Anderson String Quartet, featuring violinists Marianne Henry, Diedra Lawrence and Nicole Cherry, and cellist Michael Cameron. The concert begins at 11:00 a.m. in the MGA Theatre, located in the Arts Complex off Eisenhower Parkway.

Acclaimed bass-baritone Oral Moses will perform at 10 a.m. Wednesday, Feb. 13, in the Rehearsal Hall, located in the MGA Arts Complex.

Dr. Andrew Manis, a writer and history professor at Middle Georgia State University, will talk about his award-winning biography of the Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth at 7:00 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 21, in the Rehearsal Hall, located in the MGA Arts Complex. Shuttlesworth was the pastor of Bethel Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala., from 1953-1961.

The paintings of local artist Wilfred Stroud, including three works commissioned for Middle Georgia State's Black History Month celebration, will be on display in the college's Student Life Center throughout February.

Black History Month events

Middle Georgia State University students will celebrate Black History Month with musical performances, an art exhibit and lecture on Civil Rights leader Fred Shuttlesworth. The events, all open to the public, are scheduled during February. Admission to each is free.

  • Middle Georgia State's Black History Month observance begins Friday, Feb. 1, with the Marian Anderson String Quartet, featuring violinists Marianne Henry, Diedra Lawrence and Nicole Cherry, and cellist Michael Cameron. The concert begins at 11:00 a.m. in the Middle Georgia State University (MGA) Theatre, located in the Arts Complex off Eisenhower Parkway.
  • Acclaimed bass-baritone Oral Moses will perform at 10 a.m. Wednesday, Feb. 13, in the Rehearsal Hall, located in the MGA Arts Complex.
  • Dr. Andrew Manis, a writer and history professor at Middle Georgia State University, will talk about his award-winning biography of Shuttlesworth was the pastor of Bethel Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala., from 1953-1961.
  • The paintings of local artist Wilfred Stroud, including three works commissioned for Middle Georgia State's Black History Month celebration, will be on display in the college's Student Life Center throughout February.



  LAST MODIFIED: 2/23/2016